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Ontario, Canada Black Goat Farm and Sanctuary helps all kinds of orphaned and abused farm animals, such as:

  • goats
  • turkeys
  • chickens
  • ducks
  • guinea hens
  • pigs
  • sheep
  • cattle 

Along the way, they also help other animals that come along, like dogs, feral cats, and even wildlife like opossums.

Daily, you never know what you might see on the farm, such as a cat cuddling with a rabbit and a goat. In this case, the couple saved the Flemish Giant rabbit from a meat farm. Other times, you may see cats cuddling with pigs.

“Just a rescue Rabbit, Goat and Cat hanging out on a blanket.”

Images and media via Instagram/totes.the.goat and TikTok

Frequently, the sanctuary’s Megan Mostacci and Mike Peddle take in feral cats and kittens, which are common in the area.

“We live in an area with a LOT of feral cats. We have our regulars that we feed and trap for spays and neuters. These are true ferals. Generations living wild. We have taken in kittens and found them homes when young enough,” they state on Instagram.

🐐 Newest ‘Black Goat Baby’ – Nora 🐐

One day, Mostacci, a vet tech, took in their newest “Black Goat baby,” a tiny kitten covered in maggot eggs. Someone delivered it to her on a Wednesday night around 11 pm after finding her outside all alone in freezing temperatures. Later, they would name her Nora.

Inundated with an influx of rescues, local rescues and shelters were overwhelmed. So, Mostacci agreed to care for the neonate kitten, knowing the tiny girl would need round-the-clock care. Just days before, she had endured heartbreak at losing another abandoned kitten. Also, she already had a house full of fosters, but she said, “we owe it to her to try.”

“She was already badly chilled when she arrived – after an hour of slow warming she was a safe temp to try to feed. The first night of feeding was not fun for either of us, but she’s finally getting the syringe and nipple,” Mostacci wrote.

Baby Nora, Black Goat Farm

Also, the rescuer had to individually remove each maggot egg, which would have soon hatched and harmed the two-day-old kitten otherwise.

“After 2 hours of picking the eggs out of her fur with a mascara brush, I was certain I had gotten them all. It was a long night.”

Tiny kitten rescued on Black Goat Farm, Canada

Fortunately, this kitten was growing stronger the following morning.

“She’s happy, full, warm, and cozy. She was making the smallest little purrs this morning when she had her post milk snuggles.”

Nora in the blankets, Black Goat Farm

💖 Nora at Five Days Old 💖

Five days later, Nora was a week old and growing fast.

“She’s grown from 80g to 145g (now that she’s sorted out syringe feeding- there is no stopping her!) After each meal, she gets a little belly massage to help her burp up any air she may have swallowed while eating. She loves her little massages and purrs up a storm. Her baby teeth will start erupting, and she’s been chewing a bit on her blankets or my fingers for comfort,” she wrote.

With all the care she received, Nora would continue to progress, and then feedings would be every 3 hours.

“Once she hits 200 grams, we will stretch her feedings from every 2 hours around the clock to every 3. I never thought I would be excited about 3 hours of sleep 😅. We still have a long ways to go. Kittens this age can still crash without warning. She likely didn’t get colostrum which is less than ideal. However, she’s a purring machine who loves her bottles and belly rubs. She’s a feisty little girl, and she’s a fighter.”

Nora Learns ‘How to Cat’ on Black Goat Farm

When Nora reached one month old, she began interacting with the other kitties on the farm after a long quarantine for parasites. Fortunately, after weeks of sleepless nights, Mostacci and her husband no longer needed to offer overnight feedings. 

Now, it was time for Nora to learn about “how to cat” from the other foster cats and kittens. With no littermates to learn from, she would begin to socialize and learn how to behave. It’s one reason why it’s often better to adopt kittens in pairs.

“Solo, hand raised kittens have the potential to become very spoiled and have no boundaries. Many don’t regulate play due to the lack of littermates to learn appropriate play from,” Mostacci explained.

Below, Nora meets Walter, the tuxedo cat, taking over his hidey-hole.”

“Nora spotted Walter in one of his fav spots. As soon as he left, she took over. He wasn’t too sure what to think when he returned, but he let Nora stay in the hidey house. Nora has come so far from the ice-cold, maggot-covered little newborn that was brought here late one night. Weeks of sleepless nights – well worth it ❤️”

Kitten with cat, Black Goat Farm

As you can see below, Walter didn’t mind sharing his hiding spot with the kitten.
Walter and Nora

Nora Grows into a Cutie

At four months old, Nora had grown into a beautiful little cat. While she grew up, the couple had to recover from COVID infections, recovering as volunteers helped around the farm.

Nora bites the railing

“Today, I was looking and Nora and realized how grown up she seems 🥺.”

Kitten grown into cat

“This little lady is just about 4 months old. It’s hard to believe how many days and nights were spent feeding her every 2 hours around the clock.”

Four month-old kitten

Thanks to Black Goat Sanctuary, Nora will have a chance for a long, happy life. 

The Story of Black Goat Farm and Sanctuary

Megan Mostacci and Mike Peddle started the sanctuary after finding the struggling baby goat at a small-town auction. After taking Totes home, they wanted to help other farm animals who don’t have legal protection like domestic animals.

“Each and every one has a name and a story,” their website states. In the beginning, a little black goat named “OG Totes” or “origina goat” started it all six years ago. 

After saving Totes, he grew into a huge, “majestic” goat. 

“Totes is one of the most majestic souls I’ve met. He is the poster child for tall, dark, and handsome. He totally knows it too,” they write.

Black Goat Sanctuary

After that, they began saving many other animals. When visitors arrive, they are surprised by how much they behave like friendly puppies.

“People are quite surprised when they come here and meet them. They say they are just like dogs,” said Mostacci. “I guess our perspective really changed quickly,” said Peddle. “You see no distinction between them and a household pet.”

Megan Mostacci and Mike Peddle, Black Goat Sanctuary, Ontario

Although these farm animals would generally be seen as commodities by many, the sanctuary recognizes and respects that they deserve a better quality of life.

“Whether they are here or somewhere else, they just need to be treated better, because they deserve it,” Peddle says.

To learn more, you can follow them on Instagram and Facebook.

Below you can see more about the Black Goat Sanctuary via CBC Life:

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