What Your Cat’s Sleeping Position Is Saying To You

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It’s been said that cat’s spend 70% of their lives asleep. And because of this, it might actually mean that there’s more to it than just sleep. Cats sleep a lot for a few reasons, actually. One of which is because of their high protein diet, they need to sleep so that their bodies can break down food properly. Another is that your cat isn’t actually fast asleep every time they appear to be sleeping. cat sleeping positions

Each cat has their own certain preferred sleeping position. But did you know that the way that your cat sleeps can give you insight into that little feline mind of theirs?

Here I will break down for you some interesting facts about cat sleeping habits and help you to decode your cat’s sleeping position…

cat sleeping positions

Sit Up Sleeper

Has your cat ever been seated upright with their eyes closed? Usually their tails will be wrapped up around their paws as a way of making them feel secure. If you watch closely, your cat is probably not actually sleeping. They are snoozing, which means that they can still take off in a moment’s notice should they need to. Look at their ears, too. Your cat’s ears are like mood receptors. And when those ears quickly twist backwards, this signals that something has caught their attention—or possibly annoyed them. Remember, those 32 muscles your cat has that control their ears are simply to ignore you with, human.

Your cat snoozing is much different than actual sleeping. When your cat is snoozing, this typically lasts fifteen to thirty minutes at most. They choose to position their bodies in such a way that they will be able to run off at a moment’s notice should something startle them.

Curled Up Kitty

Cats love to be comfortable, but they also love to be warm. During those warmer months, you might not find your feline friend sleeping like this as often. For animals in the wild, they sleep curled up with their tails wrapped around their bodies to preserve warmth. Your cat might be doing the same. Your cat also might want to hug their body tight because they are feeling insecure and the warmth and closeness brings them security.

cat sleeping positions

For wild animals, this also serves as a means of protecting their vital organs. That spoiled kitty in your living room might be far removed from a wild cat, but remember that his thought process is still deeply embedded into his feline DNA. Cats have become domesticated over centuries but their brains are still hardwired as fierce predators who rely on survival skills. 

Did you know that the weather can affect your cat’s sleep cycle, too? Just as we humans feel increasingly tired on those rainy days, so does your feline friend.

cat sleeping positions

Eye Still See You…

Have you ever looked at your cat who appears to be sleeping but one or both of their eyes is partially open? Well, that’s because they are not sleeping. Your cat is doing this as a way to pass the time but still keep watch on the world around him.

And even though this is a very light form of cat sleep, this cat sleeping position can go on for hours if your cat chooses. Although it might seem a little strange or freaky when we see their third eyelid showing. Remember, cats are cats.

cat sleeping positions

Bread Loaf Kitty Cat

When kitties bread loaf, they do this because they feel relaxed and at ease. Your cat is not a naturally trusting creature. Even though they know you well and rely on you for food, they often remain guarded due to their nature. If your cat has his legs tucked underneath his body and his eyes are gently closed, they are actually snoozing, not sleeping, most likely.

Think of this as them relaxing. They are preserving their precious energy, so to speak. When cats do the bread loaf, they do so because they do not see any threats or imminent danger and feel as if they have the opportunity to relax. And, of course, catch up on their cat naps.

cat sleeping positions

Kitty Sleeping On You

Whether it’s your arms, your stomach, your legs or even your head—your cat chooses to sleep with you because they have a desire to be near you while they are letting their guard down (AKA sleeping!). Your cat typically will choose to sleep at parts of your body that are less likely to move as cats do not like to be disturbed when they are sleeping. But in a nutshell, your cat choosing to sleep with you is the ultimate sign of trust and respect. Enjoy it!

Does your cat sleep with you? We have three purrfect reasons why they should!

Belly Up Cat

Most cats are not fans of having their bellies touched, and when cats sleep with their bellies up like this it makes it all too tempting to want to pet them there. Your cat flashes you their belly as a sign of trust, because when a cat is on their back this is when they are most vulnerable. Take this as a sign that your cat looks to you as their trusted friend. Notice that cats will show their belly to other cats too, often when they sleep in close proximity.

cat sleeping positions

Stretched Kitty

If your cat’s sleeping position is that of a cat who looks like they’re doing the Superman, or their legs are simply stretched out in front of them while they lay sideways, this is a great thing. When cats sleep like this it means that they are relaxed, at ease, and most of the times they will be off in dreamland while in this position.

When your cat sleep likes this with their legs extended out from their bodies they are often deep asleep. Usually they will rest their heads on one of their legs to prop it up just a tad. When your cat is sleeping stretched out, they have not a care in the world.

Did you know that cats are most active been dusk and dawn? Because of this, it just might explain why we observe them sleeping so much. Learn anything new about our feline friends? Share this article with other cat lovers you know so they can learn something, too.

Want to learn more about cat sleeping habits and facts? Check out this article here on ColeandMarmalade.com.

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